ABC: Music (2011) – V

Music is very important to me. I like to surround myself with music throughout the day: when I wake up; when I’m on the road; when I’m eating; when friends are visiting; when I feel sad; when I feel happy. No moment is truly experienced without a certain ‘soundtrack’ to accompany it.
I can get quite attached to a song which creates two distinguished consequences:

1- I find it very difficult to share, for I consider it my song. As soon as others start to play the song the love can extinguished quite easily. Only the very best survive this challenge.
2- The song will be played over and over again until it has completely integrated with a certain moment in time. So the next time I hear it again it will take me back to that specific moment.

I try to learn myself that ‘not sharing the music’ is relentlessly selfish and very much not the point of what music is about. Music is about sharing and bringing people together. So therefore I decided to make a tribute to all the music that is or has been important to me. Hopefully it will inspire others to share their own personal music alphabet and to explore the musical sights that were off their map before.

V: Venus in Furs (Velvet Underground)
The first time I heard Venus in Furs by the Velvet Underground I was completely swept off my feet. The psychedelic and enchanting melody turned my idea of music inside out and upside down. I listened to it again (something I rarely do) just to make sure I had heard it correctly.

Only after some numerous plays I started to pay attention to the lyrics. I had caught some words during previous listens, but it hadn’t really worked its way into my brain. The name of Severin especially made me think. Around the time I started to notice the lyrics I was also taking part in a course about psychoanalyses in cinema. One of the movies we discussed was the French movie Belle de Jour by Luis Buñuel (1967). The main character was called Severin (Séverine) too and so a full circle seemed to enclose in front of my eyes. It seemed like everything was connected: not only the names but also the themes and the atmosphere that was breathed by both of them. It felt like they were connected, as if there was a secret connection between them. Only later I learned that both were inspired by a different book and not so much by each other.

ABC: Music (2011) – U

Music is very important to me. I like to surround myself with music throughout the day: when I wake up; when I’m on the road; when I’m eating; when friends are visiting; when I feel sad; when I feel happy. No moment is truly experienced without a certain ‘soundtrack’ to accompany it.
I can get quite attached to a song which creates two distinguished consequences:

1- I find it very difficult to share, for I consider it my song. As soon as others start to play the song the love can extinguished quite easily. Only the very best survive this challenge.
2- The song will be played over and over again until it has completely integrated with a certain moment in time. So the next time I hear it again it will take me back to that specific moment.

I try to learn myself that ‘not sharing the music’ is relentlessly selfish and very much not the point of what music is about. Music is about sharing and bringing people together. So therefore I decided to make a tribute to all the music that is or has been important to me. Hopefully it will inspire others to share their own personal music alphabet and to explore the musical sights that were off their map before.

U: Use Me (Holly Golightly)
So it’s been a while…after some hectic weeks in which I started an internship I’ve finally taken the time to sit down and write another post in my music project. A few years ago while trying to do some research on the music score of Breakfast at Tiffany’s I stumbled upon an artist who – not so accidentally- shared the same name as the protagonist of that particular movie. And when some time later a song of this artist was used in a certain commercial I decided it was time to get to know this lady a little better.

Holly Golightly has a really nice discography. Us Me isn’t her best song, but it is a good representative of the kind of music she makes, and fortunately it starts with the letter U. It has a strong guitar riff and there’s something very interesting about Holly Golightly’s voice. Paradoxically it has a boring disinterest to it that makes it so interesting. I can totally understand if people find it annoying, but I do not experience it as such myself.

I hope you can enjoy it too!

ABC: Music (2011) – T

Music is very important to me. I like to surround myself with music throughout the day: when I wake up; when I’m on the road; when I’m eating; when friends are visiting; when I feel sad; when I feel happy. No moment is truly experienced without a certain ‘soundtrack’ to accompany it.
I can get quite attached to a song which creates two distinguished consequences:

1- I find it very difficult to share, for I consider it my song. As soon as others start to play the song the love can extinguished quite easily. Only the very best survive this challenge.
2- The song will be played over and over again until it has completely integrated with a certain moment in time. So the next time I hear it again it will take me back to that specific moment.

I try to learn myself that ‘not sharing the music’ is relentlessly selfish and very much not the point of what music is about. Music is about sharing and bringing people together. So therefore I decided to make a tribute to all the music that is or has been important to me. Hopefully it will inspire others to share their own personal music alphabet and to explore the musical sights that were off their map before.

T: There Is A Light That Never Goes Out (the Smiths)
I had hoped to finish this project before the end of last year, but pressure of a deadline never does any good to creativity. It drains away all fun and freedom and instead of a challenge it becomes an obligation. So now the pressure is gone I can start to share my music again because I want to and not because I have to.

I already came a far way reaching the letter T, looking back (which is a tradition at the end of a year but for once will be done at the beginning of a new year) I’m happy with most of the songs I’ve posted though for some I’ve already encountered better ones. But like I said: music is very much entangled with a certain period of time so I leave it as it is and save those ‘better’ songs for another moment. It is also the reason why I leave the 2011 in the title; the songs I showcase were enlisted at the end of that year even the songs I will showcase today and tomorrow. Cause even though I didn’t finished the project before the year was done the list was already there.

T on this list was saved for There Is A Light That Never Goes Out by the Smiths. The Smiths are a real inspiration to me. If I were able to play an instrument or to sing I would knock myself out on their music. Unfortunately I wasn’t blessed with such a musical talent. As a child I had keyboard lessons for a while, but I hated it and was glad to stop this unsuccessful road to disaster. I remember trying to learn a certain chord. My young hands weren’t capable of stretching themselves in such unnatural angles and out of frustration I threw the note book into a corner of the room and I ran off crying –something very out of character.

Luckily this was in the safety of my own living room but once at the school of music my mom decided it necessary to inform my teacher on this unfortunate event. I could die out of shame, making the failure even a harder thing to deal with. I am happy to inform you that in time I conquered the chord, but I also learned that playing an instrument would never really be my cup of tea. I leave that task to the big guys:

ABC: Music (2011) – S

Music is very important to me. I like to surround myself with music throughout the day: when I wake up; when I’m on the road; when I’m eating; when friends are visiting; when I feel sad; when I feel happy. No moment is truly experienced without a certain ‘soundtrack’ to accompany it.
I can get quite attached to a song which creates two distinguished consequences:

1- I find it very difficult to share, for I consider it my song. As soon as others start to play the song the love can extinguished quite easily. Only the very best survive this challenge.
2- The song will be played over and over again until it has completely integrated with a certain moment in time. So the next time I hear it again it will take me back to that specific moment.

I try to learn myself that ‘not sharing the music’ is relentlessly selfish and very much not the point of what music is about. Music is about sharing and bringing people together. So therefore I decided to make a tribute to all the music that is or has been important to me. Hopefully it will inspire others to share their own personal music alphabet and to explore the musical sights that were off their map before.

S: Seahorse (Devendra Banhart)
Not that long ago I visited two different aquariums in the same city; all to look for a certain kind of sea creature. The first aquarium was in a zoo. The dark corridors of the accommodation were crammed with kids, mothers and art students who were franticly scribbling on their white sheets of paper. The fish swimming behind the big glass walls were big and small, grey and colourful but none of them was this magical sea creature I wanted to see. For a second I thought to have found them: a perfect water reservoir doomed up in front of me but it was awfully quiet behind the glass. Except from some coral nothing lived in it.

The second aquarium I visited the day after was meant for families and young children. All rooms had a certain theme. Some looked like a jungle, some like a submarine and others were decorated with fantastical sea creatures. The only way to see the sharks was by entering the jaws of one of their giant relatives. Not only was the accommodation more divers than that in the zoo aquarium but also the animals that were displayed. Beside fish one could admire turtles, thornback rays, snakes and iguanas. I believed my changes to encounter this magical little sea creature among them had definitely increased. But anywhere I looked I didn’t find it.

Until I reached the highest room in the building. At the left of it one could watch a thrilling documentary in a pirate’s cabin. The highlight of it most definitely had to be the almost martial arts kind of fight between two sea creatures in which one of them dramatically lost its arm. In the other corner of the room one could let their little ones build houses out of pillow like blocks in different kind of geometrical shapes. The wall was covered by a lot of small boxes that all occupied its own little sea creature. Most of them were little fish and shrimps, but one of them inhabited something else, something I had been looking for: a little seahorse.

Its majestic allure is magical and so is his way of living. Even this little fellow with his brown monotone colour in his little box was intriguing to watch. I can completely understand why Devendra Banhart wrote a tribute to the little sea animal in his song Seahorse. The song has an epical vibe to it that does right to the seahorse in everyway. The eight minutes are almost too short. Please enjoy:

ABC: Music (2011) – R

Music is very important to me. I like to surround myself with music throughout the day: when I wake up; when I’m on the road; when I’m eating; when friends are visiting; when I feel sad; when I feel happy. No moment is truly experienced without a certain ‘soundtrack’ to accompany it.
I can get quite attached to a song which creates two distinguished consequences:

1- I find it very difficult to share, for I consider it my song. As soon as others start to play the song the love can extinguished quite easily. Only the very best survive this challenge.
2- The song will be played over and over again until it has completely integrated with a certain moment in time. So the next time I hear it again it will take me back to that specific moment.

I try to learn myself that ‘not sharing the music’ is relentlessly selfish and very much not the point of what music is about. Music is about sharing and bringing people together. So therefore I decided to make a tribute to all the music that is or has been important to me. Hopefully it will inspire others to share their own personal music alphabet and to explore the musical sights that were off their map before.

R: Ritual Union (Little Dragon)
We are not Mr. Ramsay so we can look beyond the letter Q and start to couple the letter R to a song called Ritual Union by Little Dragon. This Swedish band really stole my heart and therefore deserved to be in this list. It has an energetic beat that makes me want to stand up and dance…

ABC: Music (2011) – Q

Music is very important to me. I like to surround myself with music throughout the day: when I wake up; when I’m on the road; when I’m eating; when friends are visiting; when I feel sad; when I feel happy. No moment is truly experienced without a certain ‘soundtrack’ to accompany it.
I can get quite attached to a song which creates two distinguished consequences:

1- I find it very difficult to share, for I consider it my song. As soon as others start to play the song the love can extinguished quite easily. Only the very best survive this challenge.
2- The song will be played over and over again until it has completely integrated with a certain moment in time. So the next time I hear it again it will take me back to that specific moment.

I try to learn myself that ‘not sharing the music’ is relentlessly selfish and very much not the point of what music is about. Music is about sharing and bringing people together. So therefore I decided to make a tribute to all the music that is or has been important to me. Hopefully it will inspire others to share their own personal music alphabet and to explore the musical sights that were off their map before.

Q: Quelqu’un M’a Dit (Carla Bruni)
Q obviously is a difficult letter. And if it wasn’t for my French chanson period this little project might as well have stranded at this point. A couple of years ago I really fancied French music and therefore I have exactly the right song for Q: Quelqu’un M’a Dit by Carla Bruni – before she turned into Ms. Sarkozy.

The dreamy atmosphere really takes me back to the sixties and the so called Nouvelle Vague period. I also loved her English album on which she sang poems of well-known poets. The love stopped when she started to turn up in the world of politics – politics and culture don’t really merge in my world (unfortunately). Nonetheless the song is still beautiful and worth listening to.

ABC: Music (2011) – P

Music is very important to me. I like to surround myself with music throughout the day: when I wake up; when I’m on the road; when I’m eating; when friends are visiting; when I feel sad; when I feel happy. No moment is truly experienced without a certain ‘soundtrack’ to accompany it.
I can get quite attached to a song which creates two distinguished consequences:

1- I find it very difficult to share, for I consider it my song. As soon as others start to play the song the love can extinguished quite easily. Only the very best survive this challenge.
2- The song will be played over and over again until it has completely integrated with a certain moment in time. So the next time I hear it again it will take me back to that specific moment.

I try to learn myself that ‘not sharing the music’ is relentlessly selfish and very much not the point of what music is about. Music is about sharing and bringing people together. So therefore I decided to make a tribute to all the music that is or has been important to me. Hopefully it will inspire others to share their own personal music alphabet and to explore the musical sights that were off their map before.

P: Paint It Black (Rolling Stones)
This one’s a classic! I love it :). While trying to kill some time I picked up Keith Richards’s autobiography in a metro station bookstore. I opened it up at a random page and was really amazed by the outspoken frankness of it all. Though Keith claimed to remember it all I had my doubts whether his memory is really trustworthy, as a result of all the psychedelic stuff he absorbed in his life. The psychedelic atmosphere really echoes in Paint It Black. To me it sounds like an unstoppable train, a derailed monster heading for disaster.

There’s something about trains and songs that are in a close relationship to drugs. A beautiful example is Velvet Underground’s I’m Waiting For The Man in which the sound of a train echoes in de songs melody while The Man referred to in the title is a drug dealer. Perhaps this close relationship has everything to do with the fact that they both provide a certain trip. Taking the user to a world that extents his normal horizon.

Something else that can extent our horizon is obviously television. The black and white television show recordings of the link below shows a very young band, a very clean looking audience and a danceable Mick Jagger who must have been glad that they didn’t had to use microphones to be audible at the time ;). It has a poor image- and sound quality but none of that matters cause the song is strong enough to survive and shine trough. Please enjoy: